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Winter survival

Winter survival

As we stated in the previous blog this winter is going to be a hard one on Alberta’s wild horses.  We have come across several articles in horse magazines about the care of our own horses during winters such as we are receiving this year.  In all of these articles, if the horses are on pasture, they talk about the stress put on the horses by having to paw through the deep snow to obtain enough feed.  Even our own horses which I feed, have to be monitored in order that they stay healthy this time of year.

I have attached an article posted in the last Horse Industry Association of Alberta’s, Horse Industry eNews, which speaks to this. (Click on this link which is a .pdf file and will open on a new page.)

Alberta Horse Industry – Winter Management Considerations

You can see that the older and younger horses will find these conditions the most difficult.  In studies out of the US on wild horse survival they also speak of the “thermal stress” that is put on the horses with extreme cold.  Our Alberta wild horses are undergoing all these factors already, even though this is officially the first day of winter. According to the old-timers that have lived in the area for a very long time, other hard winters like this one is shaping up to be have seen a large number of horses perish as well as other wildlife.

As this weather continues through the next few months, as the experts predict, we are going to loose a large number of these old and young horses to it.  This is sad but a part of Mother Nature and shows the main reason we do not need a capture season to allegedly manage wild horse numbers.

The wild horses desperately need your help by urgently writing or emailing both Minister Robin Campbell and the Premier, Alison Redford to not go ahead with any capture season this winter. It is apparent that the only groups that want a capture season are those that want to line their own pockets to their own selfish benefit by catching and selling the wild horses that go for slaughter.

WHOAS does believe the wild horses and their numbers have to be managed properly and we have a plan to do this. However, it is certainly not going to be needed this winter. It is really imperative that you let the government know how we, as Albertans, feel about the welfare of these beautiful and magnificent wild horses.  The horses really need our help this year. 

Contact info:

Honourable Robin Campbell
Minister of Environment & Sustainable Resources
#323 Legislature Building
10800 – 97 Ave
Edmonton, AB T5K 2B6
robin.campbell@gov.ab.ca

Premier Alison Redford
Office of the Premier
#307 Legislature Building
10800 – 97 Ave
Edmonton, AB T5K 2B6
alison.redford@gov.ab.ca

We thank you for your continued support. Bob

7 Responses to “The cold, snow and your wild horses”

These captures are horrifying!!!! I challenge Alison Redford and her loving daughter and Robin Campbell to go out to one of the captures and see the real truth that goes on. It is doom and gloom, wild animals scared for their lives. Picture a group of free animals piled and jammed into a confined trailer and pens. NOT a pretty sight. The only place you will soon see these magnificent animals is at the Calgary zoo as a endangered species. Sleep well.

Contact info for P.M. Stephan Harper:

Office of the Prime Minister
80 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 0A2

Fax: 613-941-6900

This is very wrong on so many levels…it must be stopped!
If the Alberta government does not want to stop this cruel action…then it is time to go over their heads.

A tragedy and a travesty . Ignorance is bliss. I recently watched “Wild Horses Wild Ride” on Netflix. Truely inspirational . 100 horses, 100 days and 100 trainers to tame and train these horses that then go up for auction . How hard would it be to do this here? I suggest that we could do something similar here. There are plenty of venues where we could hold the auction in Calgary.
I rode for most of my life, there is nothing more magical than being near or on a horse. I still have wonderful connections in the equine world, and as horse lovers we all have a common bond.
I would be more than willing to help with persuing this venture.

I am starting to believe that Robin Campbell believes animal abuse is okay which is what he is doing with these wild horses!!! Our government is disgusting!! Time to vote for a government that will protect our wild life not destroy them. Sadly I think our government is out of control and greed is more important than preserving our heritage, my next vote will be the right one.

Ms. Redford has NO shame what so ever. She doesn’t know anything about horses. Let nature do the culling. These culled horses are going to their deaths for money. That is what Redford is all about!!! Redford BACK OFF and leave these animals alone in nature.

When i see ads on Travel Alberta on t.v, magazines n’ even in books at the Travel agencies, they ALL have WILD HORSES running FREE, as one of the great heritages of Alberta. To me it seems this killing, is Not needed as nature always takes care of its own this way, This whole thing is Disgusting, Cruel, and very Heartbreaking. Who are these animals hurting? They fend for themselves and stay away from everybody so why is this happening. I for one need answers to this question???
Why can they not be adopted by ranchers if you think they must be culled out. I really do believe ” MONEY ” is the big factor in this whole mess.

Left by Noreen Plain on February 16th, 2014

I don’t personally agree with either the cull or slaughter in general. I own several horses that I use every summer at the racetrack, one of which is a thoroughbred that most ppl would have sent to slaughter when he was injured. His owner decided to do a wonderful thing and let him heal. Now he is mine and one of the best under western tack. What I would really like is too buy one of these wildies or even two. If they are already caught, culled and destined to be broke or slaughtered, well, I can’t stop the slaughter but maybe I can help with a home and a job for one of theses guys. If anyone knows a way lemme know.

Something to say?