Alberta Mountain Horse, "Dexter"

Alberta Mountain Horse, “Dexter”

WHOAS is so pleased to have found homes for all but two of the rescued horses that we took in from the cull that occurred this last February. Our adoptive families keep us informed of how extremely well these intelligent and wonderful these horses are coming along in their new homes. We still have a couple for their new owners to pick them up which should be soon. Then we have this gelding, “Dexter” and a filly, “Sheva” that still require new homes.

Alberta Mountain Horse - "Sheva"

Alberta Mountain Horse – “Sheva”

Although the response for wanting to adopt a wild horses was very strong at the beginning, many potential adopters never got back to us even though we did send out our application form. If you are still considering or wanting to adopt, send us an email to WHOASalberta@gmail.com. We have included a video link showcasing these two.

Adorable Adoptable Alberta Wild Horses

Bob

 

Oh it feels so good to finally stretch out

Oh it feels so good to finally stretch out

Finally “Queenie” our older rescued mare, delivered her foal this morning. The family that is going to adopt her with her foal, named the baby “River” if it was a colt. So “River” it is.

Proud Mom and babe

Proud Mom and babe

Both “Queenie” and “River” are doing well. He is a very strong and energetic one day old baby.

Trying out my new legs

Trying out my new legs

It was a nice sunny day and all the young ones and the mares were soaking up the warmth. As it sits now we have two wildie foals and and two rescued mares with foals. This makes it such a joy to be at the site and being blessed to be able to watch the antics of these new babies.

Safe and secure in their shelter

Safe and secure in their shelter

Bob

 

Blondie's baby

Blondie’s baby

For all our volunteers and visitors you will be happy to see that today Blondie has finally produced her foal, a little colt. We know that many wondered if she was ever going to foal especially given the size of her.

The newborn just a few hours old

The newborn just a few hours old

We would like to introduce you to the little colt we’ve named “Stryker”, strikingly beautiful!

Testing my legs

Testing my legs

Like any new foal it was extremely wobbly when it first started to move and we held our breath many times when we thought he might fall over one of the logs.

Now I got it!

Now I got it!

Bonding with a very hungry mom

Bonding with a very hungry mom

Life is very tiring

Life is very tiring

It won’t be long before he will be able to race around like his cousin, “April,” who is growing stronger every day.

Striking a pose

Striking a pose

We got great enjoyment out of watching little “April” put on a show as she raced around the waterer over and over again.

Yahoo - on the fly!

Yahoo – on the fly!

Our other little “Angel” who was born to “Princess” is also getting stronger each day and has become quite a character. Often times she investigates the three young boys in the next pen. She also comes right up to us humans to see what we are doing in her pen. The beautiful “Princess” allows us to have close contact with her and her baby as long as there is feed involved!

I like to run too!

I like to run too!

During the day we open their pen and allow them to wander down the alleyway to visit all the other horses. “Angel” takes this opportunity to race about as fast as she can. Mom just doesn’t care as she just does her own thing.

There are two more mares we expect to foal soon. We believe “Queenie” one of our rescued mares should foal imminently. The other wildie mare, “Belle” well, we just don’t know.

Springtime and babies . . . just a joy!

Bob

 

WHOAS new baby

WHOAS new baby

Thursday evening we were resting comfortably after spending another full day at our facility working with the wildies when a phone call came in from our veterinarian, Bruce. He informed us that he had to assist our one pregnant mare, Princess, in delivering her foal. He just happened to be at the site in regards to another matter, and checked on the horses before he was going to leave. This is when he noticed that Princess was in some distress trying to give birth. One of the legs of the foal was further out than the other one and as it turned out the foal’s one shoulder was locked inside the mare. Using his expertise he was able to enter the pen and pull the foal. Princess’s natural instincts then took over as she began to clean her foal.

Very wobbly legs

Very wobbly legs

Upon hearing this we headed to the site to check on everyone’s welfare. The little foal was standing and trying its best to move about on its little wobbly legs.

Getting my balance

Getting my balance

We then worried about whether the foal would be able to nurse. We were thrilled when we heard the loud slurping sound coming from the little one. When we put the flashlight on it, we chuckled as it was sucking at mom’s leg. However, in a short period of time, the foal found the right spot and got her very important first drink.

Exercise

Exercise

With little sleep we were out first thing in the morning and found our little filly extremely healthy and her mom was looking very good as well.

The little filly

The little filly

Mom and babe

Mom and babe

In the adjacent pen, we have our three young colts who are very interested in their new “cousin.” Princess however did not like their attention to her little girl.

Warming in the sunshine

Warming in the sunshine

Feeding time

Feeding time

Prior to last night we had spent considerable time working with Princess to gentle her to the human touch. This obviously paid off as she allowed Bruce to help her. Also that when we enter the pen she is calm and not stressed by our presence.

Investigating the pooper scooper!

Investigating the pooper scooper!

As the day wore on the little filly slept, ate, pooped and gained strength.

Urging mom to get up for more milk

Urging mom to get up for more milk

By the end of the day when we left our little “Angel” was running around the pen and tormenting the boys next door!

It is truly amazing that Bruce happened to be there at that particular time and moment when Princess needed help. Nothing happens in this world without a reason.

Truly adorable

Truly adorable

Now we wait with much anticipation for the arrival of Queenie’s baby which should be very soon. We have also been working with her to assure that everything, no matter what, goes smoothly.

Bob

 

 

Growing stronger every day

Growing stronger every day

The little filly, “April” is doing extremely well as she grows and learns to explore this new world she is in.

Darn bugs

Darn bugs

With the warm temperatures the flies and such are out and our little girl looks annoyed as they bother her.

Mountain climbing

Mountain climbing

At our WHOAS site we have a pile of gravel which caught the little girl’s attention and being a youngster she had to explore it.

Can you ever see a lot from way up here

Can you ever see a lot from way up here

“April” looked so proud of herself as she looked down on the rest of the herd and her mom “Babe”.

Tuckered out

Tuckered out

After all that exploring and mountain climbing she finally was tired and laid down beside mom to get some rest, before she was off again.  She moves so freely across the terrain and mom has to continually try to keep up with her.

Working with and around all these wild horses, including the ones we have rescued, is so rewarding and a heartwarming experience.  All of the volunteers who continue to come out to help have all fallen in love with the wildies and continue to spread their stories of how rewarding it is to see the progress of each and everyone of these beautiful horses.

Bob

 

The 3 amigos

The 3 amigos

Things are getting a little quieter at the WHOAS Mountain Horse Facility, as more of our rescued horses have moved on to their new homes. We still have the two pregnant mares who are getting closer to foaling, but have been adopted. As well we have four colts that are waiting for their journey to their new forever homes, and six horses available for adoption. Two of our youngest ones were to go to a new home, but due to an illness to their adoptive home, they are available again.

Pictured above are the two of them along with their friend, “Ted” who cannot wait their turn to go for water. Instead they have learned to drink out of the end of the hose which is just hilarious to watch.

"Ted" enjoying refreshments

“Ted” enjoying refreshments

Even though we are still waiting for our rescued mares to foal, we had a great surprise awaiting us on Monday as one of the resident wild mares presented us with a little filly.

New life

New life

“Babe” is the new mother of “April.” She is a wonderful and protective mother.

Stretching my new legs

Stretching my new legs

On the move with my Mom

On the move with my Mom

What's this green stuff?

What’s this green stuff?

How wonderful they truly are!

How wonderful they truly are!

We will keep you posted on “April’s” progress and any other new additions that are shortly to come.

Bob

 

 

I have provided an update on our wild horse rescues below, but I am also excited to provide a link to a Youtube video that was produced for us by a group of people who love the wild horses as much as we do and also WHOAS’s  work to help them.

WHOAS Youtube Video

 

Our Romeo

Our Romeo

This past Saturday, WHOAS, was again fortunate enough to have a team of veterinarians out to our site to finish the gelding process for the rest of our young boys.  Everything went extremely smooth and the last five boys that were to be gelded came through their operation in great shape.  The only youngster not gelded yet is little Romeo who we want to get in better shape and put on more weight before he is done.  We believe this little boy lost his mom last winter and yet survived through the rest of the year, ending up captured this February.  He showed signs of not having gained enough proper nutrition in order to fill out his body when we rescued him.  He is responding so very well now, putting on weight and is so cute as he follows you around the pen as it is cleaned just to see what these humans are up to.   We know that our little ugly duckling will turn out to be a beautiful horse.

Awaiting his turn

Awaiting his turn

Each young boy is led into our chute first where he can be safely sedated by the vets.

The operation

The operation

Once sedated the patient is led down to the pen where he will be operated on and then allowed to recover.  The whole time they are kept under observation by a WHOAS volunteer and regularly checked by the veterinarian.

Back on his feet.

Back on his feet.

Here is young Aries who has gained his feet, but still is a a little wobbly.  Each of the boys who is gelded also have their wolf teeth removed are given their 4 way vaccine and dewormed.  The gentling process that all of our horses go through plays an important role in allowing all of this to happen without incident.  Before the horse gets to this point though, no matter their age, they can be led throughout the pens and into their stalls in the barn.  This also keeps them calm and secure as everything is happening to them.  Our volunteers have done a wonderful job in assuring that the horses are taken care of.

Patches being led back to his pen after watering

Patches being led back to his pen after watering

Here is a young student, visiting from England, who joined in to help out with the daily chores, including leading the horses to water and then back to their pens for breakfast.

LOaded and ready to go home

Loaded and ready to go home

With our gentling process and getting all of the horses in our care taught to being led and put into stalls at night, has greatly helped when it comes time to load them into a trailer to travel to their new home.  From the smallest to the biggest all have loaded extremely well and with absolutely minimal fuss.  As of today we are still awaiting the arrival of their new owners and 4 that are still up for adoption.

Louie going for water

Louie going for water

Here the beautiful 5 year old Louie is led to water.  He is our most talkative boy and is always whineying out to the other horses or the resident herd when they come to visit our site.

Back to his pen for breakfast

Back to his pen for breakfast

Of the four horses we have left up for adoption we have a 3 year old, “Curly” whom we thought had a new home, but his perspective new owner has not gotten back to us at all and so we will put him back on our list of horses for adoption.  He is a beautiful young boy, very attentive and intelligent in how he perceives everything going on around him.

Gorgeous "Curly"

Gorgeous “Curly”

Then we have the 2 year old “Sheva” who is quite spirited and is responding well as we get to spend more time with her.

Wonderful "Sheva"

Wonderful “Sheva”

The we have “Penny” a yearling filly who has yet to have someone pick her as an adoption.  She is a fantastic young girl, curious and again gorgeous.

Our "Penny"

Our “Penny”

Of course there is also “Romeo” who is pictured above.

Queenie

Queenie

Princess

Princess

Along with these wildies we still have our two pregnant mares who are getting close to term for their foaling.  We now have them in separate pens in order to give them sufficient room to become a mom.  “Queenie” the 5 year old mare is still very shy of us, but that is okay as we do not want to cause her any stress.  “Princess” the younger mare is doing well, but is becoming very uncomfortable as her foal moves into position within her.

 The wild herd mares, Star and Bell

The wild herd mares, Bell and Babe

Mystery

Mystery

Blondy

Blonde

Portero

Portero

Then we have our resident herd, where three of the wildies are pregnant and should also be foaling soon.  They will be doing it out in the woods, but we will keep track of everyone to assure that all is okay.  The one mare who is not pregnant, “Mystery”, is amazing to watch.  When one of the other mares shows signs of discomfort or such, she will go over to them, whinny softly and then nudge their tummy.  Aren’t these wild horses wonderful!!!!!

Bob

 

 

Discussing strategies

Discussing strategies

Last Monday, March 30 WHOAS was fortunate enough to have a team of Veterinarians and vet students attend at our handling facility to begin the gelding process for all our young boys.  WHOAS volunteers were also out in force to assist where necessary and of course do the regular maintenance and feeding of the horses.  Pictured above the vet teams prepare to work on the first young colt, “Teddy”.

In the chute

In the chute

Each of the colts and studs were first placed in our handling chute.  This kept everyone safe and the horse a lot calmer.  Once in the chute a sedative was administered to the animal.

The operation

The operation

Once sedated the horse would be walked down to one of the pens we had set up as operation areas.  Here the knock out drug was administered by the team as one of the WHOAS volunteers kept control of the young horse until he laid down.  At this point the team went to work, first checking their vital signs and assuring the animal was completely under.  Teeth were examined and wolf teeth extracted.  Blood tests were done on each horse also to assure that they were okay and oxygenating properly while under sedation.

The operation

The gelding process

Once all this was done one of the vets or a student under direct supervision gelded each individual horse.  The actual operations went quite well and quickly.  It was the recovery time for each of the horses that kept things moving slowly, but safely for the young horse.  Each young one was given adequate time to come out of the sedation and recover to his feet.

A little wobbly

A little wobbly

Once on their feet and somewhat steady, each of the young boys was led by volunteers to a recovery pen. Here again they were kept under observation for about an hour before allowing them to eat.

The never-ending job

The never-ending job

As any horse owner knows cleaning pens and poop patrol is ongoing. We are so grateful for the volunteers that show up and help out with chores to take care of these wonderful creatures. Once that job is done, everyone takes part in the continuing gentling.

Still sleepy

Still sleepy

Here is beautiful Louie, quite complacent to sleep it off in the sunshine. We wish to thank everyone who showed up on Monday – the vets, students, volunteers and even the visitors who watched and photographed the proceedings of the day. We hope to have all the colts that were gelded on their way to their new homes by the second weekend of April. We still have 5 boys that need to be gelded and we hope to have that done as soon as we can in order that they too can go to their forever homes.

Bob

 

Porter our resident stallion

Portero our resident stallion

Now that the publicity over the last captured season is subsiding things have become rather quiet. The number of individuals requesting information on adopting one of the wild horses we rescued has also slowed substantially.  Of the 28 horses that WHOAS rescued, 3 of the young fillies have moved on to new homes already.  Another 13 of the young horses have been adopted and will be going to their new owners in a few weeks.  Those individuals who have adopted their choice of the beautiful horses, filled out the application form and returned it to us right away to assure the horse they wanted would be theirs.  We sent out a large number of application forms, but only the 15 have been processed.  So far all the youngsters that have been adopted are assured of going to wonderful forever homes.

What a  beauty!

What a beauty!

Louie, pictured above, is still unadopted and is waiting to be gelded.  He is our most mature horse that we rescued, being around 4-5 years of age.  He is very vocal and is always talking to the other horses in our pens and especially to the resident wild horse herd that comes to visit every once in a while.  He will need a very experienced horse person to take him further than our gentling process does.  He is a gorgeous and very intelligent wildie.

Somebody is calling

Somebody is calling

Here is Bailly one of our adopted young fillies acting out.  Portero had come close in and let out a loud whinny and as soon as Bailly saw him she started to get all excited jumping up and running around her pen.  It was humorous to watch her antics as she tried to gain the stallion’s attention.

Come on sweety

Come on sweety

Working with Cindy

Working with Cindy

Here, Greg is working with Cindy, still unadopted, teaching her to pick up her feet.  She is a very quiet mare who definitely does not mind the attention she gets.  Our volunteers that come to assist have been of great help to us as we continue to care for all these wonderful horses.  It is not all glamour because it includes cleaning the pens and stalls of all the droppings before we get to work with the horses.

Getting use to the touch

Getting use to the touch

One of our newest volunteers teaches Dexter, also unadopted, how good it can feel to be brushed, touched and also loved.

Working with the youngsters

Working with the youngsters

Our youngest horse, Bruce, unadopted, is also being taught how nice it can to be rubbed and scratched all over.  Bruce is going to need a special home as right now both his hind legs have extended pasterns.  We hope that with proper nutrition he may strengthen and they will straighten up.

Cute little Bruce

Cute little Bruce

The little filly Diamond

The little filly Diamond

Our five youngest ones share a pen and it is heartening to watch they antics and different personalities play out – horse therapy!

Adorable Dexter

Adorable Dexter

Dexter is one of our yearling colts and he is still looking for a forever home. He is easy to work with and readily accepts his human companions.

We continue to have visitors who want to spend some time with the wildies and of course we welcome the volunteers who want to have hands-on experience working with these beautiful horses.

WHOAS wishes to thank Innislake Dairies for a generous donation of hay. We have also had other individuals come forward to help us with assuring that there is enough feed – thank you to all of you that have donated.

Bob

 

 

 

 

Full tummies and warm sunshine

Full tummies and warm sunshine

Here three of our most recent rescues stretch out to rest in the warm sunshine.  All of our rescues are adapting well to their temporary home as the gentling process continues.  This pen will be the last ones to be haltered and then gentled.  As in the last blog we have one of the mares in this pen, who is getting close to term with the foal she is carrying.

Momma

Wild Ghost Bay

She will be with us until her foal is old enough to be transported safely without stress and they will go as a family when it is time.  Upon examining the horses more closely we find that she is not the only mare that is in her pen that is carrying a foal.  It was a surprise to find the young 3 year old mare (A20) is showing signs now.

Me too!!!!!!

Me too!!!!!!

This beautiful sweet mare is very friendly and curious of us whenever we work around them cleaning the pen or doing the feeding.  She definitely is not as far along as Wild Ghost Bay, but her baby tummy is starting to show.  So she will be with us for a while also.  Then she and foal will be adopted as a family unit.

Ready to go to a new home

Ready to go to a new home

Here two of the young fillies, “Missy” and “Lilly”, are prepared to be loaded and go to their new home where they will grow up together.  I am sure that they will be given new names when they get to their forever home.

The loading

The loading

It was a pleasant surprise as Missy hesitated just a few seconds before she jumped in the trailer and then Lilly just jumped in without hesitation.  I received an email indicating they had arrived home safe and sound and were enjoying their new surroundings.

Apollo

Apollo

One of young horses that was adopted this weekend is Apollo.

Percy

Percy

It has been fun as Greg and Jack have come up these names to help identify them when they are working with them.  This little one was given the name Percy and is now adopted.

Curly

Curly

This beautiful young stud has also been spoken for.  Curly as he was named is doing well, but like some of the older wildies maintains his dignity and is a little aloof from our human touch.  When you go into his pen to clean though he follows you around making sure you are doing it right.

Patches

Patches

Perhaps our biggest adoptee, Patches, is a beautiful young boy who is still looking for a new home. He is unique in his appearance and when he looks at you he has such a beautiful soft and curious eyes.  As more and more people come to visit to learn about our facility and what we are doing for the wild horses, they also fall in love with them and become a voice for them.  We also continue to receive applications for adoptions and make arrangements to visit to pick out a wild horse that will be theirs in a new forever home.

Beautiful soft eyes

Beautiful soft eyes

Our gentling of the wild horses is moving along well and we now have halters on all but 6 of the horses we are working with to allow them to go to good homes.  Some are easier than others, but with the gaining of their trust they all come around and accept us and what we are trying to do for them.  Of course the two mares in foal will have to wait quite a while before they are haltered to lessen any stress on them.

We wanted to include this picture of a young boy that was rescued by WHOAS and a member last year. He was taken to his new home in southern Alberta where he was gentled and has now begun his training for becoming a saddle horse. This shows that these beautiful horses with caring love and patience can become a suitable partner for whoever does adopt one.

Freedom

Freedom

We continue to welcome interested applicants to submit a request to adopt and we will email the application forms. The most important thing we want for all these horses is that they go to good forever homes.

Bob