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WHOAS Calendar 2015

Again we encourage the supporters of the Alberta wild horses to purchase a fund raising calendar.  All monies raised goes directly into our work for the horses.

We would like to invite our followers to come and visit us at our booth at the Cremona Winter Fest on December 6th.

Calendars are also available for pick up at the Smokes and Toast Restaurant in Bowden, the Red Barn and Gifts in Water Valley, the Sundre Museum and at the UFA in Olds. We are also now able to take payment by use of PayPal.

Thank you to all who support us through the purchase of these beautiful calendars.




 

Getting out of here

Getting out of here

November has brought in the snow and cold to wild horse country.  The back country roads are busy everyday as it is hunting season for big game hunters.  Soon however this season will end and the country side will settle down allowing all of the creatures to get on with the business of life.  Hopefully the snows will not come as hard and heavy in December as they did last winter, making it such a hard struggle for the animals including the wild horses, to survive.

WHOAS continues to make strides forward in our goal of assuring that the wild horses of Alberta do not have to undergo some of the atrocities that have occurred to them in past years.  Since we were formed we have not strayed from our goals to work for the benefit of the horses or from our Mission Statement:  ” Our mission is to ensure the provisions of all aspects of the conservation and humane treatment of wild free-roaming horses in Alberta.  We are committed to the preservation of these magnificent animals in their natural environment.”  We continue to work hard in our efforts to make this a reality for the horses.

In doing so WHOAS has entered into a new and exciting endeavour.  As of November 1, 2014, we have entered into an agreement, called a Memorandum of Understanding, with the Alberta government’s Environment and Sustainable Resource Development (ESRD) department. This is a momentous occasion for the wild horses, WHOAS, and the ESRD.  This document is a five year agreement that allows WHOAS to work in collaboration with the ESRD to humanely manage wild horse populations in the Sundre Equine Zone.

How will this be achieved?  The first is the PZP contraception program where a limited number of wild horse mares will be selected each year to receive this vaccine. Working with our veterinarians and other university researchers, we will show over these 5 years, that this is as very effective humane and safe method of helping control wild horse populations. The number of horses on the landscape is the biggest concern for other stakeholders and users of our Alberta public lands. Therefore this program becomes an essential management tool. The total cost of this whole program is being paid for by WHOAS which includes a large donation by one individual.

The second strategy is an adoption program.  In the past, wild horses that strayed onto private land and roadways or got themselves into trouble were generally removed and many ended up going for slaughter.  Now WHOAS will have the authority to rescue these horses.  Some times in the wild, foals are abandoned by their herd, especially when the dominant stallion is replaced by a new one.  WHOAS will also have the ability to rescue these foals.  This past summer we had to rescue 9 wild horses that found themselves in these situations. We have had to keep them at a member’s private ranch until they were adopted out. Handling the older horses was difficult, but we did it and found forever homes for them.

Another factor in this adoption agreement is that only if or when necessary, WHOAS will be called upon to remove some horses from their environment. At this point we will be very selective ensuring that only the younger horses are removed and not whole herds or pregnant mares. This will assure that the dynamics of the wild horse herds will remain intact. Again, if this becomes the case, it is our aim that all these animals will be gentled and put up for adoption. No more wild horses will ever be sent for slaughter.

Now, due to a very generous donation of 20 acres of land from private citizens.   WHOAS now has a site in which to construct a proper humane and safe handling facility. To this end we have begun construction.

Construction begins

Construction begins

Site preparation

Site preparation

A facility such as this has been long sought after by WHOAS. With proper pens and equipment, we can make sure that any animals that come under our care can be handled safely.

More preparation

More preparation

Shelters

Shelters

blog 6

Also having the proper ability to handle these wild horses will make the process of gentling them for adoption much easier.

blog 5

Another view

Another view

The office

The office

A team of dedicated volunteers continue to work hard to have this ready as soon as possible. WHOAS also wishes to thank some of the businesses who have helped out with equipment, materials, supplies and time. There have been many and we are grateful for all this support which helps with the financial costs. Again, all the costs to have this facility put into place and running, except for the donations as mentioned, is being born by WHOAS. To this end the sale of our annual fundraising calendar supports these endeavours. We want to thank the hundreds of people who have already purchased the calendars to help us save our Alberta wild horses.

The resident herd

The resident herd

Another fascinating feature of this piece of property is that there is a herd of wild horses that also calls this area home. Every day when we are there to work, they come to visit. The stallion of this herd is a magnificent creature that really typifies all that is wild about our horses. We have named him Portero (the gatekeeper).

Portero and his son

Portero and his son

As we move forward with our work for the wild horses we also will use this facility to develop an educational program and visitor centre.  Here there will be opportunities to learn more about the history of our wild horses and the role they play in the ecosystem of the foothills today.

We encourage anyone who wishes to help us to order a calendar, as all monies raised, is used for the wild horses. The cost of the calendar is $25 which includes postage and handling and can be ordered by sending a cheque or money order to:

WHOAS
Box 70022
Olds, AB T4H 0A3

Or you can also use the PayPal link on the previous blog to order online.

Bob

WHOAS Calendar 2015

We would like to invite our followers to come and visit us at our booth at the Millarville Christmas Fair, November 7-9.  Here you can pick up a copy of this beautiful fundraising calendar and learn more about our ambitious initiatives to assure that our Alberta wild horses remain forever on the landscape of our foothills.  We will also be at the Cochrane Ranch Christmas event on November 23, the Olds X-mas Fair on November 29 and the Cremona Winter Fest on December 6th.

Calendars are also available for pick up at the Smokes and Toast Restaurant in Bowden, the Red Barn and Gifts in Water Valley, the Sundre Museum and at the UFA in Olds.  We are also now able to take payment by use of PayPal.

Thank you to all who support us through the purchase of these beautiful calendars.

Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

 

 

WHOAS Calendar 2015

 

 

WHOAS is pleased to announce that the 2015 fund raising calendars are now available. The calendars have been received so well in the past and we appreciate all who have supported us over the years by purchasing them. The sale of this calendar is the only fund raising that WHOAS undertakes and all money raised goes into helping us protect and save the Alberta wild horses.

The cost of the calendar is $25 which includes postage and handling and can be ordered by sending a cheque or money order to:

WHOAS
Box 70022
Olds, AB T4H 0A3

As you have read in the previous posts, WHOAS has undertaken some important programs to assure that these wild horses remain forever on the landscape. WHOAS has always worked toward the goal of preventing some of the tragedies that have happened to these horses in the past. We are positive that our current course of action, working with the ESRD, will help us properly manage the horses.

Some of the costs we have incurred are substantial but through the generous donations of many individuals and companies, along with this fund raising through the calendars, we are able to fund all these initiatives.

I think it is important for our followers and the public to know that WHOAS is a registered, non-profit society in the province of Alberta.

Bob

 

Fall colors

Fall colours

Summer is gone and the colours of fall have descended on the landscape in wild horse country. There has been an abundance of moisture all summer which has allowed the grass to grow and grow. The wild horses took advantage of this to build up their body reserves and all the horses we’ve come across are in excellent condition.

Strong and healthy

Strong and healthy

The foals that have survived have grown strong and are doing quite well. One thing though that has been noticed by ourselves and others is that several herds do not have any foals and there are very few yearlings to be found. This is due to the hardships that the horses had to endure last winter. We can only hope that Mother Nature is not so harsh this year.

Taking advantage of the season

Taking advantage of the season

These two young boys, like the rest of the wild horses, are using this time of year to build up their body condition for the winter that is yet to come.

Young grizzly

Young grizzly

Curious moose

Curious moose

Not only are the horses using this time of year to prepare for winter, so are other wildlife that inhabit the eastern slopes. We have seen more grizzly bear this year than ever before and like this young 2 year old, they are all busy foraging for food. The moose, too, are taking advantage of the succulent leaves that are still on the trees.

Flies - the tormentors of fall

Flies – the tormentors of fall

Until the cooler weather does come, this time of year flies can cause a lot of distress to the horses and other wildlife. As with these three, the flies cover their faces and get in their nostrils and ears causing them some aggravation.  The horses, therefore, are constantly on the move or standing closely together to allow the tails of the other horses to fend off these annoying bugs.

Misty morning

Misty morning

As fall progresses, so does WHOAS in moving forward with our proposals to assist in wild horse population management. We are still in negotiations with the ESRD who has responded so positively to our initiatives. As stated in previous blogs, it is our sincere belief that working in mutual cooperation with the ESRD and other stakeholders that we can assure a positive outcome for the wild horses.

In regards to the adoption plan and rescue facility, we have secured through a generous donation a parcel of land which we will develop. We have purchased proper panels and other equipment to this end. This proper equipment will assure that any horses we take in, as in this past summer, can be safely, securely and humanely handled. It will also assure the safely of the WHOAS volunteers that we will need, when it comes to working these truly wild animals. We have spent a large amount of our funds to get this up and running and we hope to have it in operation by the end of October.

As far as the PZP contraception initiative, as stated we are still in negotiations to get this properly put in place. We have gathered a team of volunteers and other professional people to assist us as we move forward. Using the expertise of this group, WHOAS will assure that this plan can and will work strictly for the benefit of the wild horses. Moving forward we have also used our funds to purchase some of the required equipment necessary.

Whenever everything is in place and ratified by all parties involved, we will be making an official announcement to advise our supporters and the general public. Until then, we will keep working, as we always have, to our longterm goal of having the wild horses of Alberta better protected so that they will always remain on the landscape.

WHOAS appreciates all the donations made by individuals who believe in what we are doing and truly support the wild horses of Alberta. Our major fundraising effort which will be very important this year, to allow us to carry on this work, is our annual calendar. This will be available before the end of October and we hope for a successful campaign and that you will purchase one to help the horses.

Bob

                 Wild Horses of Alberta Society

2015 Calendar

2015 Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

Secure in the trees

Secure in the trees

As previously posted WHOAS has two wild horse population management proposals before the ESRD.  Both of these took a considerable amount of time to be put together, refined and then submitted to the government for their approval.  Both of them would allow for a much more humane way of dealing with management of our wild horses, than have gone on in the past.

One of these proposals was an adoption program which would allow WHOAS when and only if necessary remove horses from their natural environment.  This would involve older horses and younger that found themselves in trouble having strayed on to private land or being abandoned by their herds.

We are progressing well with getting things into place in order to accomplish this.  As you can read from other posts, this year we have had to work with more horses than ever before, to gentle and then re-home them.  Although it would be nice if this never had to be done, unfortunately it does and will continue to happen.  We hope to have a permanent facility up and running by late fall.

Probably the most controversial one that WHOAS is supporting is a contraception program that will target a number of wild horse mares each year, using a drug called PZP.

What is PZP and how does it work?  A non-cellular membrane known as the zone pellucid (ZP) surrounds all mammalian eggs.  The ZP consists of several glycopprotiens, one of which is ZP3, which is the molecule which permits attachment of sperm to the egg during fertilization.  PZP, a vaccine, not a hormone, is derived from ZP protein of pig ovaries.  When this vaccine is injected into the muscle of a target female animal, it stimulates her own immune system to produce antibodies against the vaccine.  These antibodies then attach them to the sperm receptors on the females own eggs and thereby block fertilization.

A few points here is the process used to obtain this is quite extensive and is done at the Science and Conservation Center in Billings, Montana.  A team of three individuals working under strict conditions process the pig ovaries in order to obtain the PZP.  One thing also to point out is that no additional pigs are slaughtered to obtain the ovaries that are used, as they come from animals already destined to be processed.

How is PZP administered? WHOAS will be using a remote delivery method to inject the targeted mares.  The dart gun we will be using is operated by CO2 and has a range from 8-60 yards depending on the settings used.  The vaccine itself is mixed with an adjuvant and then inserted into a 1.0cc barbless dart.  The dart, when it hits the animal, injects the vaccine and then falls out.  For the most part it will be like a bite from a horsefly to the mare.  It causes no injury or harm to the animal. It has no debilitating side effects.

If the mare is already pregnant, she will be able to carry through with her pregnancy with no negative effects.  Following her foaling in the spring, she will not be able to be fertilized by the stallion if she is bred.  Furthermore, her female foal will be unaffected and able to reproduce herself upon maturity. For the mare not carrying a foal within her, the vaccine will act as it is supposed to and just prevent fertilization of her eggs by the stallion’s sperm.  Breeding will occur but not fertilization, thus the dynamics and functioning of the herd remains intact.  This is one of the biggest bonuses of using this vaccine.  Herds will not be torn apart and the lead stallion and herd mares will continue to maintain stability of each harem.  This in itself assures that indiscriminate breeding of immature mares by young stallions most likely will not occur.

A booster shot will be administered to each mare targeted within the next year.  This will then give the mare a pregnancy break of up to three years.  This vaccine if used in this manner does not make an animal sterile. This pregnancy break has been proven to allow a wild horse mare to build up her body reserves and therefore in the future able to produce healthier foals.

Since the vaccine is a protein it breaks down easily and therefore cannot enter the food chain and will not have any negative effects on animals that may prey on a wild horse. It is completely safe for the environment and WHOAS will assure that all darts used are recovered and disposed of properly according to veterinarian protocol.

We have heard that some people are concerned that our wild horse genetics would be lost and that this contraception program will negatively affect these. Research done by leading geneticists has shown only the strongest genes are passed on to the next generation as our Alberta wild horses have evolved to survive in their environment. Where rare gene lines are no longer relevant to these horses, they are discarded over time. So the genetics that our Alberta wild horses carry now are the ones that allow them to survive and become the unique and beautiful animals they are today. Isn’t Mother Nature fascinating!

As we move forward with this program, WHOAS will not be going into any given area and applying the vaccine indiscriminately. Only a few mares from each area that have already proven their reproduction capability will be given this pregnancy pause. Therefore, again, allowing the social structures and behaviours of our wild horse herds to remain intact.

Some opponents want the horses just left alone but that is unrealistic considering all the factors that play a part in the management of all creatures living along the Eastern slopes. Many other stakeholders including ranchers, forestry and recreational users, have to be considered when determining the best method of assuring that our wild horses can and will remain on the landscape. In wild horse herds throughout the United States, even the BLM is abandoning the wholesale capture of their wild horses in certain locations and allowing the contraception program to manage the numbers. In Europe, including the Danube River estuary, where there are over 1,000 wild horses, the PZP program was adopted to allow the survival of the herds but control the numbers. This very humane method works and will prevent, in the future, if given a chance, previously used inhumane methods of removing the wild horses for population control.

WHOAS asks for your support in these endeavours to protect your wild horses for future generations.

Bob

 

 

 

The wildie foal, Sunset

The wildie foal, Sunset

WHOAS is so happy to let everyone know that all our rescued wild horses now have new forever homes to go to.  The little filly “Sunset” will be going to a new home in northern Alberta, “Timber” to a home close to Calgary, “Rex” to one near Warner, Alberta and our old mare “Angel” will be going to one close to Lethbridge.  It is inspirational to see individuals who love the wild horses as much as we do, step up and take on the responsibility of giving these wonderful horses a loving home.

Treed up and getting away from the swarms of flies

Treed up and getting away from the swarms of flies

Our last few trips out west we have found most of the herds in the heavy timber in attempt to escape the onslaught of black flies and nasty biting horse flies.  You will also find a few small herds in the clearings that are exposed to the winds trying to do the same.

Swishing tails

Swishing tails

In the clearings they stand in tight groups allowing for the swishing tail of another horse to keep the flies away from their face and front shoulders.  They are constantly moving in tight circles and throwing their heads to try to help.  This little boy tucked under the tail of any of the mares that were close to him.

This time of the year you will also find that several harems will band close to each other.  They find areas that give them security but also protection from the bugs and heat.  Close by there will likely be a mineral lick and/or mud hole too.  The stallions are tolerant of each other as long as the other herd stallion does not cross that magic line.  We can sit for hours and watch the antics and behaviours of these magnificent creatures.

On our last ride we started to ride past one of these harems and we had six groups come flying out of the trees at full gallop. There were 42 horses all together and they came thundering by us. On horseback I could not get to my camera quick enough and our horses so badly wanted to join in with the fun, so we just enjoyed the moment. They only ran a short distance and then broke into the individual herds as they started to feed.

The life of a wild horse is not easy and this summer many foals born in the spring are no longer with their herds. Weather and sickness do play a role in this as this also affect the older horses. Predators also take many horses. Wolves usually only take down the sick and injured. Grizzly bears, if they have an opportunity to ambush a wild horse, will take one down, even a very healthy one. Cougars, however, take more wild horses than the other two predators combined. Over the years we have seen many horses that have survived and carry the scars of such an attack. It is hard to tell whether some of these survivors eventually succumb to their injuries.

Larry Semchuk, a WHOAS member, author and photographer of the wild horses, sent me the following photographs of a young stallion that had survived a terrible attack.

 

The lone young survivor

The lone young survivor

Here is the first photograph of this stallion who was by himself close to a mineral lick the horses and other wildlife use. You can see the skin that has been torn from his flank.

Horrific open wound

Horrific open wound

Larry’s photograph here shows some of the terrible wounds that whatever predator attacked him left.

Right rear flank

Right rear flank

Even though there are some wounds on this side, you can tell the attack came from the left. This leads us to believe that it was probably a bear as cougars usually attack from above onto the neck and shoulders of its prey. Also since the attack was from the rear, and the stallion survived, he probably left his attacker with wounds from his hooves. Since he is young, strong and appears healthy still, we hope that he will heal. And some still say the wild horses have no natural predators!

Bob

 

Learning about a box stall

Learning about a box stall

Well the gentling process for all the wild horses in our care is progressing very well.  A decision was made to wean little Sunset, the filly, early from her mare.  The old girl, Angel, even though she was getting lots of excellent hay and had a high protein molasses tub in her pen, was not getting her body condition back very well at all.  We hope that by removing the drain of having to nurse the foal, she can pick up more quickly and put more weight.

Sunset is losing her baby coat and once she was haltered and tied in her box stall, she certainly enjoyed the brushing along her back and hips to remove more of the hair.  This is also gives assurance to her that everything is okay.

Very adorable

Very adorable

Sunset settled into her box stall very well where she is out of the bugs and the hot sun.  We had quite a few of our members around and she is learning quickly to get use to all the different people and sounds. She loves her hay too and did not hesitate to start munching away while tied.

First taste of "Browns" foal  milk replacer

First taste of “Browns” foal milk replacer

Here she is being introduced to her first bucket of milk replacer.  This is still very important to assure that she gets the proper nutrition she needs.  Still a little shy about it,  the bucket had to be held up to her muzzle.  In a short time and as she gets to like the taste she will start to drink it all up.

 

Angel wandering alone last fall

Angel wandering alone last fall

This is the story of the mare.  Last September we were back to close to Lost Lake which is north of Williams Creek. Then as we came over a hill we noticed a lone white horse wandering down a logging road.  As we got closer we could see that it was a mare and that she was alone with no other horses close by at all.  We thought that she may not be a wild one and we also felt that the odds seemed stacked against her being able to survive.  So we tried to approach her, getting to within 8-10 feet before she moved away slowly.  We tried several times to get close enough to get a rope on her but that would not happen.  Finally she wandered off, but we knew we had to come back and try to find her.  We did make several trips back there throughout the fall without success.  Late December we saw her close to main forestry road but still inside the forestry.  the snow in this area was extremely deep and survival for even a healthy horse had become a struggle.  Even though she had lost a lot of weight she had survived, although she had become very elusive.

Then in late April we noticed that she had given birth to a foal and was still in this small area.  Here she had lots of protection in the trees, she could find feed and she was also probably safe from any predators since it was so close to the  main road. She was doing okay even though her body condition had deteriorated quite drastically due to giving birth to the foal and the overall struggle to survie such a harsh winter that claimed many other wild horses.  All things seemed okay until it was noticed in May that she was now on private ranch land next to the area where she had lived all winter. The reason she got onto this land was that some fool had cut the ranch fences thinking that this would help her. We worried about her and her foal for many reasons, including the fact that two young grizzly bears had moved into the same area.

Then in June, WHOAS received a phone call from the ranch asking if we wanted to purchase her due to the fact that they could not keep her after bringing her into their corrals.  This is what we did and she was then brought into our temporary facility at Dan’s and Karen’s ranch to join a couple of the other wildies we had rescued.

 

Rescued

Rescued

Since then she has received lots of hay and received minimal gentling as we wanted the mare to get into better condition and also to allow the foal to grow. This initial gentling process was just touching her and being around her. Then as mentioned it was decided more had to be done to help the old girl out, thus the foal was removed from her. At the same time that this had to take place, Dan and the boys managed to get a halter on her. At first she did not like being restrained at all. But as the day progressed, she started to yield to the pressure of rope and halter.  As we watched, we felt so sorry for her as she was trembling with fear, but what we were doing was so necessary in order to properly care for her. We continued at this point to softly talk to her trying to reassure her that we meant no harm. The soft approach and voice began to calm her.

Starting to accept that we are okay

Starting to accept that we are okay

Here she has calmed down and started to take hay from Dan’s hand. WHOAS hopes that we have now given her a chance for a much better life. We believe we have found a forever home for Angel where she can peacefully live out the remainder of her life.

Loving the touch

Loving the touch

Timber, pictured here, has been gelded and will be shortly moving to his new home. He has come so far in his training and will still require some work which we know he will get with his new owner.

4 year old Rex

4 year old Rex

Rex too has been gelded and is leading very well, likes to be brushed and is ready to go to a forever home. He will make an excellent horse as he is intelligent and willing to learn which continually shows through when handled. We hope to find him a home quite quickly now as we believe he is ready.

WHOAS only charges a $300 adoption fee to help cover the costs of board, feed, vet bills as well as initial training. These older horses do take a lot longer to gentle than the younger ones we have worked with in the past. Sunset too will soon need a forever home. Please contact us if you would like to adopt either of these two beautiful horses.

Bob

 

 

The welcoming committee

The welcoming committee

One of the great joys we have is taking our own horses for rides out in wild horse country. Just going for an enjoyable ride is great, but riding out here is fascinating when you come upon a herd. It was no different this past Friday when we took our two boys out west. Driving down the back trail to where we wanted to unload, we were met by this group sunning themselves around a mud hole.

Getting ready for the trail

Getting ready for the trail

Just after unloading we could hear some crunching in the bushes and looked up to see four young studs peering through the bush at us.

Curious neighbours

Curious neighbours

Unafraid and very curious they came in to within 30 feet of us to see what we were doing. They stayed in the immediate area while we saddled our horses and were still there as we rode off down the trail.

Wyley, the wildie, and our Akitas

Wyley the wildie, and our Akitas

One of our horses is Wyley who was rescued many years ago and has turned into an exceptional trail horse. The most amazing thing about him is that he will always let you know when there are other “relatives” of his around. His calmness and trail sense now makes it a joy to take him back into the country he was born in. We had a great ride under ideal conditions. Then upon returning to our trailer this was our greeting.

A large contingent to welcome us back

A large contingent to welcome us back

As you can see by this picture, there are no yearlings in these three herds. It is a fact that not only us, but many others have also noticed and are taking note of this. The other distressing point is that a large number of foals born this spring are no longer with their herds. That is the case with the herd in the middle of the above picture.

Just gone

Just gone?

This is a little filly that was with the herd just five days previous. Leaving our horses tied to the trailer we went for a walk around the herd to see whether it was just lying down. Unfortunately it was no where to be found and had succumbed to either sickness or predators.

WHOAS strongly believes and will be pushing the ESRD not to have any capture season this coming year due to the large number of horses lost this past winter, that there are very few yearlings left with the herds, and now the loss of a large number of foals this spring.

Wandering through a grassy hillside

Wandering through a grassy hillside

One of the things we noticed on this ride was the abundance of grass growing throughout the whole area we rode.  This is a key point because not only were there lots of wild horses but also a large number of deer in the area. The only trails we rode on were ones made by the horses and they were all in good shape and not torn apart by overuse.

A week ago, we were riding down in Sandy McNabb, which has an excellent equestrian campground, horse facilities and trails. This area is used extensively by not only equestrian riders, but also hikers. What we found was that the cattle which had only been allowed in there for approximately 10 days, had decimated many of the lower trails. Also all the small creeks in the valleys were running brown from the disturbance caused to the banks by the cattle (there are no wild horses down here). So when people bring up the argument about horses destroying the environment, anyone would just have to witness what we and many others we spoke to had. Many of the other equestrian campers were upset with the cattle being allowed in this area and the damage they were doing. The individuals and so called experts  that make these claims against the wild horses would not be able to substantiate any of that nonsense if they had been able to witness this damage. Don’t get me wrong I do not begrudge the cattle leases or allotments as long as these cattle ranchers stop blaming the horse for their perceived problems on our public lands and recognize that their cattle have more of a negative impact on the environment than any other creatures do.

Sunset and Angel coming along well

Sunset and Angel coming along well

WHOAS had to take in more wild horses this summer  than we ever had to in previous years. This is due to several reasons but it is still part of our mandate. However, we are limited to the number that we can take in due space and financial considerations. It is expensive caring, as any knowledgeable horse person will tell you, for a horse. Add on the time that has to be devoted to the gentling process to make these horses adoptable, it can become onerous. We are doing the best we can right now. Hopefully when we have our own facility up and running, and our charitable status, we will be able to work with more rescues as needed.

Angel and Sunset will have to remain with us for a period of time yet to allow the filly to be properly weaned and the mare to get back into proper condition. This costs money, but we are not complaining but welcome any support. And for those that have donated, WHOAS and our foster charges thank you.

A new treat - black oil sunflower seeds

A new treat – black oil sunflower seeds

We had a good laugh as Timber walked up to taste what was in the bucket. We made sure he did not get too many as he took an immediate liking to this delicacy! He is doing extremely well and loves to be bathed with the hose. It is nice to know that he has a home to go to as soon as he is gelded, which will be soon. He leads well, goes into the barn calmly to a tie stall, and does love to be scratched.  The saddling process is just a short time away.

Rex and Dan

Rex and Dan

Rex too is coming along very well, becoming socialized and accepting of humans and all the steps he is put through to make him adoptable. WHOAS is still looking for a forever home for him. He still has to be gelded. He displays his wild horse intelligence and willingness to learn. This is what makes a wild horse such a good mount and such good trail horses, just like Wyley.

Coming in on the run to check us out

Coming in on the run to check us out

WHOAS continues to look for the support of those who love the wild horses as much as we do and wish to help us in our efforts to have all wild horses afforded a better life.

Bob

 

Mesa 1

Mesa 1

This is a photo of a young wild horse from the Mesa Butte area, west of Millarville, called Mesa.  Last year a couple were riding out there and came across a foal without a herd.  As they rode off the little guy began to follow their horses looking for company.  When they got back to their trailer he was still with them and acting out of kindness they loaded him with their horses and took him home.  They cared for him over the summer and then noticed he had a hernia.  The people this spring took him to Moore and Company where the vets there determined that although the hernia will not affect his health, it was inoperable.

Mesa 2

Mesa 2

As you can see the hernia is large but you may also see it has not affected his growth or health as he is a yearling now.  The people who took him in had hoped to make him a riding horse but now that is impossible and so they are just looking for a new home for him where he can just live and grow.

Mesa 3

Mesa 3

If you would like to give Mesa a new home send me an email and I will put you in touch with his humans.

Bob